Hunter Panels Names Whitton as VP, Sales and Marketing

Words: Dan KamysHunter Panels Names Whitton as VP, Sales and Marketing
Hunter Panels LLC, a manufacturer of polyisocyanurate roof insulation, named Jim Whitton has been promoted to the position of VP of sales and marketing. He replaces Alma Garnett, who recently left to pursue other interests.
 
Whitton has been in the roofing industry for more than 27 years and with Hunter Panels since it was founded. He is a graduate of DePaul University with degrees in accounting and education, and served as the regional tapered manager and marketing manager for NRG Barriers prior to joining Hunter. He is a member of the Roof Consultants Institute and on the board of directors of the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association.

Hunter plans to open a new plant in Spanaway, Wash., later this year and double the size of its Kingston, N.Y., plant in 2013. The company recently introduced Hunter Xci, a polyiso product designed for use in commercial wall applications to provide “ci” continuous insulation within the building envelope.
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